Flipped PD on Growth Mindset

In Year 3, Day 3 of Teacher Leader Corps, my colleagues and I created this flipped version of our most recently delivered professional development session on growth mindset.

Growth Mindset Adobe Voice video

I love Adobe Voice. I even use it for my holiday video and sent a video poem to my father for his birthday. It’s extremely user friendly and students can create good products quickly.

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Vocabulary PechaKucha!

Today at PD, I created a student-driven technology lesson for introducing new vocabulary in my academic chemistry class. As a preface: PechaKucha is a presentation format the includes 20 slides, presented for 20 seconds each (for a total of just under 7 minutes).

Blank Student Template:

Make ONE slide related to your term with the following info.

  • Provide TWO definitions that you found
  • Rewrite them into ONE definition in your own words
  • include any variables, units, or formulas that apply
  • include one image to illustrate your word
    • it should take up most of the slide
  • Be able to explain your word for/in 20 seconds

Technology Integration Matrix Review: This lesson falls under adaptation in all categories. I’m okay with that considering I am working towards more technology integration for that group of students.

Ten Tweets to Learn Twitter

TwitterTwitter, like all social media platforms, is what you make of it. It can be used for good, evil, or become the proverbial black hole for your time. Through its use, I’ve connected with educators outside of my school building that have become invaluable members of my professional learning network/community/team/whatever. I like to call them my virtual friends (and I get teased about that on a regular basis). I also use it to interact with my students and parents by sending out reminders, updates, etc. from another account dedicated to my classes.

In a recent professional development, participants were encouraged to use an honor-system badging spreadsheet to create a fun, interactive, gamified aspect to the PD. They completed “quests” to earn experience points (XPs) and “level up” as participants. I thought it was fun since I started toying with gamification in my classroom last year. One of the ways that participants could earn XPs was to tweet about their experiences throughout the week and use a hashtag for the particular event. However, there were a few teachers who were unfamiliar with Twitter and were not able to level up as much in the gamified part of the PD as compared to those who are Twitter pros.

So I wrote this post as a quick how-to guide for them. I assume that anyone working through these tweets has already created an account, so make sure you do that first!

Go ahead and Follow someone too…

  • Twitter will automatically suggest some people to you from your contacts
  • You can also search for someone by real name or user name at the top of the screen
  • If you’re stuck, type in @AWTeachesSci in the search field and follow me!

Secondly, look at the graphic below to understand the surprising amount of info contained in a Twitter post (called a tweet).

TweetAnatomy

Anatomy of a Tweet

Now you’re ready to dive into ten quick tweets!

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Google Education Basics

certificate

This was really easy. I hope that the Educator Certification exams are similar, but I also hope to learn some new tricks with Google Apps and Chromebooks. I’m waiting for them to revamp their modules and exams (which will happen on November 21st, if anyone out there cares to complete this process as well). Luckily, I got a grant to pay for my examination fees!

Nearly-Paperless Classroom

Nearly Headless? How can you be nearly headless?  – Hermione Granger

Disclaimer: I don’t believe in:

  • a truly paperless classroom
  • technology as gimmickery
  • one [teaching] method to rule them all
  • drill and kill (but practice does make permanent)

I do believe in:

  • not assigning busy work
  • authentic homework assignments
  • saving paper

This year (with only one week until school started) it was decreed that each teacher would have a set number of pages copied per semester (each SIDE counts as one). This number varied by department, but there was no apparent consideration of the number of students, common teaching practices for the subject, etc.

I’ve had to ask my students to print things at home. I’ve moved to lesser testing practices of copying only one class set of tests that students cannot annotate (I came up with giving them a transparency and erasable marker) and cannot keep for future studying. It also fosters cheating because I used to have multiple versions of tests. I’ve done these things because I can’t make copies frivolously. However, I’ve NEVER made copies frivolously. I always try to conserve paper.

That being said, I have found a reason to be thankful for this proclamation. My website traffic is higher than ever before. I’m averaging 70 visitors per day (and I have about 70 students).

Just in the past month:

Classroom Website traffic 10-2014

Classroom Website traffic 10-2014

Even more impressive: in the past year…

Visitors by country. Oct 2013-2014

Visitors by country. Oct 2013-2014

In fact, my classroom website caused me to be headhunted by a local tutoring center and personally asked to review a new study/resource website for science classes by the site’s developer… who lives in the UK. If that’s not proof that I’m impacting people outside of my school, I don’t know what is.

So, thanks for forcing me to become even more paperless than I already was. My website has blown up as a result. The funny thing is, my husband’s math website blows my stats out of the water.

 

Google Docs, Drive, etc.

Yesterday, I led an early release workshop incorporating the use of Google Docs to allow students (in this case, my colleagues) to paperlessly conduct a collaborative close read. Over the past couple of years, many colleagues have asked me for info on Google Docs and Google Drive. Below are actual assignments that I give to my students at the start of a new semester (minus a little identifying information), but you may find them helpful for your own use as well.
Google Docs (learn GDocs features and share docs with you)
Google Docs and Google Drive (learn GDocs features and creating shared student folders)
More pontification and philosophy following…

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